History of Innovation

An AEWorldMap.com site

Author Archive

1927 – First Trans-Atlantic Flight

leave a comment »


Image Source

Innovation:  First Trans-Atlantic Flight

Location: New York and Paris
Year:  1927
By: Charles Lindbergh

In 1927, at 7:52 a.m. on May 20th “a pilot named Charles Lindbergh set out on a historic flight across the Atlantic Ocean, from New York to Paris.” [1] This was the first trans-Atlantic non-stop flight on an airplane. Lindbergh became an American hero, as well as, attracting millions of private investment dollars nearly overnight with the support of millions of Americans. Lindbergh decided that he wanted to go alone on this flight without a navigator in order to carry more fuel. The plane he flew was 28 feet in length, with a wingspan of 46 feet, carrying 450 gallons of gasoline. The trip took 33 hours, 29 minutes and 30 seconds, with fatigue as his main problem. He divided maps from his local library into thirty-three 100-mile segments to make sure that he was on the right path. He arrived in Paris on May 21 at 10:24 p.m. with 80 gallons of fuel to spare.

Air-transport opened up opportunity for people, information and goods to travel long-distance more quickly.  Trans-atlantic and Trans-pacific commercial airlines began services in the late 1930’s

Source: [1]

Advertisements

Written by Alizain Maredia

May 20, 1927 at 7:52 am

Posted in Uncategorized

1926 Plougastel Bridge – Plougastel, France

leave a comment »


Image Source

Innovation:  Plougastel Bridge
Location: Plougastel, France
Year:  1926
By: Albert-Louppe and Eugene Freyssinet

In 1926, Albert-Louppe and Eugene Freyssinet designed a bridge over the Elorn River near Brest, France called Plougastel Bridge, also know as, Albert-Louppe Bridge, which connects Plougastel-Daoulas and Le Relecq-Kerhuon. Construction started in 1926 and was completed on October 9, 1930, however, part of it was destroyed by the German army in 1944. Repair on the bridge started shorty after and continued for 5 years, in which, the bridge was widened and reconstructed. After the reconstruction the bridge was 30 feet (9 meters) wide, 90 feet (27.5 meters) high, and 2913 feet (888 meters) in length, containing three major archs each spanning 617 feet (188 meters) with fixed, double deck structure. All this was possible with one material reinforced concrete, which held the bridge in place and made it possible for this great span to be covered.

Source: [1]

Written by Alizain Maredia

October 9, 1926 at 4:58 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

1922 Glass Skyscraper Concepts

leave a comment »


Image Source

Innovation: Glass Skyscraper Concepts
Location: Berlin, Germany
Year:  1922
By: Ludwig Mies van der Rohe

In 1922, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe came up with a concept of a Glass Skyscraper, where it was made of all steel and glass, which established the Miesian principle of “skin and bones construction.” The Miesian principle was applied to this concept by the idea of a glass skyscraper whose transparent façade reveals the building’s bare bones underlying skin similar to the plant and stem idea where each floor made of reinforced concrete slabs cantilevers off two cylindrical concrete supports. The building was suppose to be built in Berlin, Germany where the concept was created but it was put down because it was an unworkable project.

Source: [1]
Video: [A]

Written by Alizain Maredia

January 8, 1922 at 5:01 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

1921 Schindler House – West Hollywood, California

with 3 comments


Image Source


Image Source

Innovation: Schindler House Location: West Hollywood, California
Year:  1921
Architect: Rudolf Schindler

In 1921, Architect Rudolf Schindler started construction on Schindler House, which was considered to be the first house built in modern style. The house contains no conventional living room, dining room, or bedrooms. Instead of bedrooms this house contains four studio spaces. This house is meant to be a cooperative live/work space for two young families, where it is laid out as two interlinking “L” shapes that have a common space in between. A campsite Schindler had seen a year before inspired this idea of a modern style house built on flat concrete slabs where the walls are concrete tilt up slabs. The innovations in this building helped architects and engineers shift from traditional style buildings to the new modern style, which allowed the creation of different spaces in a house. In other words, a house was not just limited to having rooms and a kitchen. In fact, the home could have whatever was practical for the family, or, in this case, families.

Source: [1]

Written by Alizain Maredia

January 1, 1921 at 4:13 pm

Posted in Uncategorized