History of Innovation

An AEWorldMap.com site

1710: First commerical steam engine – London, England

with 2 comments

 
image source 1                                            image source 2
Animation: Newcomen steam engine.      Watt double-acting steam engine.

Innovation: 1st commerical steam engine
Location: London, England
Year:  1710
By: Thomas Newcomen

In 1712, the Newcomen engine was completed to put into practice in harnessing the use of steam in mechanically powering every day processes. The steam engines were used efficiently throughout the United Kingdom and Europe mainly to pump water out of mines   and wells with less effort than the traditional process.

In 1763, James Watt starts the progress of developing the Newcomen engine to result into today’s concept of steam engines. Watt realized that there was a lot of power wasted through the cooling and heating cylinder. Moreover, James Watt then started studying a solution that traps the heat in the cylinder in order to sustain the same temperature of the very hot steam.

All of these developments indirectly helped the revolution of transporting construction materials across the continent with commercial steamboats appearing in the early 1800’s, and steam-powered trains following soon after. `

Web links to more info about first commerical steam engine: [1], [2]

Advertisements

Written by Abdullah Alqaroot

January 1, 1710 at 7:48 pm

2 Responses

Subscribe to comments with RSS.

  1. magnificent post, very informative. I wonder whhy
    the other experts oof this sector don’t notice this.
    You must continue your writing. I am confident, you’ve a great readers’ base already!

    • Thank you.

      Abdullah Alqaroot

      September 24, 2014 at 8:31 pm


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: